Research Team

Kevin Randle
Dr. Kevin Douglas Randle is a prominent ufologist. Within the UFO community he is often regarded as one of the preeminent experts on the reported crash of a UFO near Roswell, New Mexico in July 1947. A professional writer with more than 80 books to his credit, Randle is perhaps best known for his books about UFOs and the Roswell story. While the vast majority of his books are science fiction and historical fiction, it's his books on the accounts of the Roswell story, New Mexico in 1947 that have exerted an enormous influence on those interested in the saga. Randle, along with Stanton Friedman, is generally acknowledged as one of the leading researchers into the Roswell story and the UFO question. He continues to work in the UFO field, although lately he has concentrated more on his science fiction books than UFO research.
David Rudiak
David Rudiak is an expert about what happened in Ramey’s office on July 8, 1947. He has reconstructed the debris in a computer ray-tracer and proven there is only one radar target there and probably one balloon (or what would fit in shoe box), in other words NOT what you would expect from a multi-balloon, multi-target Mogul but perfectly consistent with Ramey and Newton's description of a singular balloon/target and Dubose/Marcel's substituted weather balloon. Another of his Roswell specialties are his various histories of the period. He has expertise in how the story was reported in numerous news outlets, not just a few. He may have compiled the most extensive collection of U.S. and international Roswell stories anywhere. These stories present many angles and contradictions that just a few articles do not provide and tell us a lot about how the cover-up was handled. For example, he has found only two or three newspapers out of hundreds carrying a rare AP sub-version quoting Sheriff Wilcox declining to answer further questions about the "disc" saying he was ‘working with those fellows at the base.’ That he considers to be very telling and corroboration for what his family was telling us decades later. Why are Marcel, Brazel, Wilcox, Ramey, and the press release telling sometimes very different stories, often contradicting the balloon story? Why do the AP, UP, and RDR versions of the press release differ in many details?”
Brenda McClurkin
Brenda McClurkin is the Head of Special Collections and Archives at the University of Texas at Arlington Libraries. She has served in this position since July 2013, having worked as the Historical Manuscripts Archivist since October 2002. Brenda has long had a passion for archives and historical research and has taken an atypical journey toward her dream. She processed her first archival collection as a senior history student at Colorado Woman’s College in Denver and was immediately ”smitten.” Brenda began her library career in the Western History Department of the Denver Public Library. In her native state of Arizona, she detoured into architectural librarianship, and ultimately into real estate brokerage and construction. Returning to her passion, she completed her MLS at the University of Arizona in 1991. Moving to Texas in 1994, Brenda was quick to volunteer her services working with archival collections in Weatherford and Fort Worth, particularly Historic Fort Worth’s Ball, Eddleman, and McFarland family papers. She completed an Archival Administration Certificate at UT Arlington in 2001 and became a certified archivist in 2002. Brenda is a past president of the Society of Southwest Archivists and has contributed articles to the Special Collections’ newsletter, The Compass Rose; Southwestern Archivist; and Legacies, a Dallas history journal. She co-authored the fifth and sixth editions of the Special Collections' Archives and Manuscripts Processing Manual with Ann E. Hodges; Arcadia Publishing's Weatherford: The Early Years with Jonelle Ryan Bartoli; and a forthcoming title, Arcadia Publishing's Fort Worth's Quality Hill with Historic Fort Worth, Inc.
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